New Research Reveals How to Maximize the Production of Natural Gas

NMC Research Archives - NEW MEXICO CONSORTIUM

New Research Reveals How to Maximize the Production of Natural Gas

Rex Hjelm, a scientist at the New Mexico Consortium and Los Alamos National Laboratory, has new research findings that help us to understand how to maximize the production of natural gas. He just had his paper: Reduced methane recovery at high pressures due to methane trapping in shale nanopores, accepted to Nature, Communications Earth & Environment.

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Teaching Neural Networks the Game of Life

Jacob Springer, a computer science student at Swathmore College, and Garrett Kenyon, a scientist at Los Alamos National Laboratory and the New Mexico Consortium, recently published a paper titled It’s Hard for Neural Networks to Learn the Game of Life in the open access journal arXiv. The Game of Life is a cellular automaton that was created

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Tom Terwilliger and Team Develop Technique to Improve Resolution of Cryo-electron Microscopy

New Mexico Consortium (NMC) scientist Tom Terwilliger and an international team including scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Baylor College of Medicine, Cambridge University, and Berkeley Lab have developed a technique to improve the resolution of cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). Cryo-EM maps are a type of 3D molecular structure map that are created by taking many

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Hjelm and Mang’s New Publication on Explosives Performance

Rex P. Hjelm, a scientist at the New Mexico Consortium and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Joseph T. Mang of Los Alamos National Laboratory have published a new paper titled: “Preferred Void Orientation in Uniaxially Pressed PBX 9502”. This work has recently been accepted to the journal Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics. This research used the scattering

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Spartina Comes Up With a Promising Treatment to Cure COVID-19

Spartina Biotechnologies has just released exciting news of their latest technologies called SIREN™, which is a promising treatment to cure COVID-19. This new technology is designed to stop the replication of the COVID-19 virus in the infected patient while also giving a kick-start to the patient’s own innate immunity. This gives them double protection for

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Keeping an Eye on COVID-19 Mutations

Recently, Nature has published the article The Coronavirus is Mutating – Does It Matter?, which talks about the work of Bette Korber, a Los Alamos National Laboratory scientist and New Mexico Consortium affiliate. In March 2020, David Montefiori, who directs an AIDS-vaccine research laboratory at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and Bette Korber, an

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Van Allen Probes Project has New Journal Publication in Space Weather

The Van Allen Probes Project has a new journal publication accepted by Space Weather. The publication titled Defining Radiation Belt Enhancement Events Based on Probability Distributions, is authored by Geoff Reeves, LANL scientist and New Mexico Consortium affiliate, along with colleagues Elizabeth M. Vandegriff, Jonathan T. Niehof, Steven K. Morley, Gregory S. Cunningham, Michael G.

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Van Allen Probes Project Publications for July-Aug 2020

The Van Allen Probes project continues to put out publications this July and August, with three published papers, three papers in press, and two submitted papers (See below for a list of publications). This NASA funded project conducts research on Space Weather, the environment and activity in space that can harm satellites and endanger Earth-based

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NMC Supports Research and Students at New Mexico Tech

For the last 4 years, the New Mexico Consortium (NMC) has been proud to support the research of Dr. Christian M. Carrico at New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology Civil & Environmental Engineering. This research project titled “Climate Relevant Aerosol and Gas-Phase Properties in the Southwest US” is in collaboration with Los Alamos National

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Study Finds Wildfire Smoke Impacts Climate Less Than We Thought

New research recently published in JGR:Atmospheres and supported by the New Mexico Consortium, shows that the impact of particles found in wildfire smoke on climate may be less than was previously thought. This is due to reactions that happen when the plume mixes with clean air, which decrease the climate-warming effects. In this megafire study,

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