Physics

Physics

General Physics Research Projects

CRCNS - Microimaging/modeling of Retinal Responses Measured with Laser Magnetometers
NMC Physics Research Los Alamos
computing at New Mexico Consortium Los Alamos

CRCNS - Microimaging/modeling of Retinal Responses Measured with Laser Magnetometers

Igor Savukov, LANL Staff Scientist, NMC Affiliate
Bryan Travis, NMC Research Scientist
John George, NMC Research Scientist

Olga Korzh, Junior Research Scientist

The goal of this research is to conduct nuclear-spin optical rotation (NSOR) experiments at Texas A&M university in collaboration with the Dr. Christian Hilty at his dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) facility. NSOR can be of interest to applications related to National Security and it is imperative that basic science be investigated in order to evaluate the potential for National Security applications.

Collaborative Research: DNP-Enhanced Nuclear Spin Optical Rotation Spectroscopy

Igor Savukov, LANL Staff Scientist, NMC Affiliate
John George, NMC Research Scientist

Olga Korzh, Junior Research Scientist

The goal of this research is to conduct nuclear-spin optical rotation (NSOR) experiments at Texas A&M university in collaboration with the Dr. Christian Hilty at his dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) facility. NSOR can be of interest to applications related to National Security and it is imperative that basic science be investigated in order to evaluate the potential for National Security applications.

Code Development of Atmospheric Physics Application for Next Generation Architectures

Bob Robey, LANL Staff Scientist, NMC Affiliate
Jeff Bowles

In this project the Higrad suite of codes is being ported to run on next generation architectures including the Intel Xeon Phi, GPUs such as the Nvidia architecture and larger numbers of multi-core processors. The scope of the work includes the development of test suites, code quality improvements, documentation, robustness, optimizations and finally the scaling of the application to run on tens to hundreds of thousands of processes.

Plasma Physics Research Projects

Effects of the Field Shear and Flow Shear on the Kinetic Physics and Particle Acceleration of Relativistic Reconnection

Fan Guo, LANL Staff Scientist, NMC Affiliate

Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental plasma process that allows rapid changes of magnetic field topology and the conversion of magnetic energy into plasma kinetic energy. It has been extensively discussed in solar flares, Earth’s magnetosphere and laboratory applications, and more recently in the context of high-energy astrophysical systems. In high-energy astrophysical systems such as pulsar wind nebulae and relativistic jets from black holes, neutron stars, and their merging systems, it is expected that the magnetization parameter sigma can be much larger than unit. Magnetic reconnection is thought to be the driver for energy release and particle acceleration in the magnetically dominated regime.

These recent progresses have strong implications to high-energy plasma astrophysics. However, in most of studies the effect of radiation cooling may be important but not studied. The effect of radiation cooling on reconnection physics is an important problem in several extreme phenomena in high-energy plasma astrophysics, but its nature remains to be explored. We propose to use large-scale first-principle kinetic simulations including the radiation cooling to study the fundamental aspects of reconnection physics and particle acceleration processes. While most of studies focused on the cases with equal plasma conditions on both side of the current sheet, magnetic reconnection may occur at plasma boundary layers where magnetic fields and plasma flow can be significantly different. we will further study the relativistic reconnection under extreme conditions when there exists significant amount of magnetic shear and velocity shear.

PLASMA PHYSICS: Turbulence and Particle Energization in Low-Beta Plasmas

Hui Li, LANL Staff Scientist
Xiangrong Fu, NMC Research Scientist

As part of the DoE/OFES project at LANL, this project performs advanced numerical simulations to study the current sheets and particle energization in turbulent plasmas. This has applications for space, solar and astrophysical plasmas. Dr. Xiangrong Fu from the NMC has developed hybrid and kinetic simulation techniques that can contribute to this project. He shall utilize these codes to study the effects of turbulence on particle energization and identify possible applications of these processes in systems such as solar wind, solar corona and accretion disk corona. This is an important part of our DoE/OFES project.